In The News

Using a Brailler
May 24, 2017

The Associated Press recently reported on the educational training currently being provided to inmates at the State of NH women's prison.

CONCORD, N.H. — Inside a prison workshop, several inmates tap away at what look like old typewriters.

The devices are actually Perkins Braillers, which are used to write the code relied upon by many visually impaired people. In a first for New Hampshire's prison system, 14 female inmates are spending much of the year learning Braille, so they can convert restaurant menus, textbooks and novels into Braille.

"To know I could actually do something good for somebody, that is good to know," said Molly Martel, who is in the fifth year of a 20- to 40-year sentence for stabbing a friend to death.

Read Full Story > Inmates Prepare for Life Outside of Prison

Group exploration
May 15, 2017

Almost 30,000 of your friends and fellow community members are living with profound sight loss right here in the Granite State, and they are not receiving the services they could be. Less than five percent got help last year –only a scant 1,100 people. They live in large swaths of rural New Hampshire and in our cities. They are old and young; middle class and living in poverty. But, most of all, they need access to technology, education, and therapeutic services to make their lives better as they navigate life without sight or limited vision.

Read Full Story > Offering a new lens on life for the visually impaired of New Hampshire

Guided ice skating at Strawbery Banke
April 13, 2017

NH Magazine's Sarah Calahan recently interviewed David Morgan, President & CEO of Future In Sight to talk about our recent name change and the impact our programs and services have on individuals living with sight loss. We are featured in this month's online edition as their "Good Cause of the Month."

Read Full Story > Good Cause of the Month: Future In Sight

April 16, 2014

The Advocacy Committee of Future In Sight, in recent years, has been aware of New Hampshire companies, organizations and individuals who have made their facilities, programs and information accessible for persons who are blind or visually impaired. Blindness is a low incidence disability that requires a unique and specific approach to accessibility. This might include; contrast lines on stairways, descriptive video, Braille and large print brochures, audio mobile tours and tactile and embossed materials. The Agency wants to acknowledge these efforts through our annual Access Award.

Read Full Story > Future In Sight Accepting Nominations for Annual Access Award

Boy running in snow
February 28, 2017

After 105 years of working to improve the lives of blind and visually impaired people in our state, today is a new day.

The New Hampshire Association for the Blind will now be known as Future In Sight. We are so proud to announce our name change, and we believe that Future In Sight more accurately represents our clientele since 93 percent of our clients are visually impaired - not blind - and our geographic scope extends to states bordering New Hampshire. Our name aims to capture the optimism and hopefulness of new technologies, therapies, and programs that are always on the horizon to enhance the quality of life for our clients.

Read Full Story > Change is in the Air: Welcome to Future In Sight

Image By Paul Rogers
February 20, 2017

“Feeling My Way Into Blindness,” an essay published in The New York Times in November by Edward Hoagland, an 84-year-old nature and travel writer and novelist, expressed common fears about the effects of vision loss on quality of life.

Read Full Story > The Worst That Could Happen? Going Blind, People Say