Manchester, NH, June 22, 2015 --- The New Hampshire Association for the Blind honored the Currier Museum of Art as the 2015 recipient of its annual Access Award. The award is presented to a New Hampshire individual, corporation, or organization that demonstrates exceptional and innovative effort to provide enhanced access and to eliminate barriers for those who are blind or visually impaired.

The Currier earned the Association’s 2015 Access Award through its multi-year collaboration in producing an audio tour for several works of visual art in the Museum’s collection. The tour provides a detailed description of objects, ranging from paintings to sculptures. “It is such a pleasure to present the Currier with this award in an effort to honor the hard work and dedication they have exhibited to make art accessible to the visually impaired community,” said George Theriault, President & CEO, New Hampshire Association for the Blind.

“The Currier Museum was pleased to collaborate with the Association to make the arts accessible by all. We feel as though these efforts will serve to strengthen our commitment to making our collections accessible to all museum visitors,” explained Leah Fox, Director of Interpretation and Audience Engagement, Currier Museum of Art.

Sue presents award to Leah and Susan of Currier Museum

The Currier Museum of Art, located at 150 Ash Street, Manchester, N.H., is open every day except Tuesday. It is home to an internationally respected collection of European and American paintings, decorative arts, photographs, and sculptures, including works by Picasso, Matisse, Monet, and O'Keeffe. Visitors of all ages will enjoy the engaging exhibitions, the dynamic programs that range from art-making and lectures to music-making, a Museum Shop, and an airy, light-filled café. The Currier welcomes visitors with disabilities and special needs. It is wheelchair-accessible and offers FM headsets for sound amplification at many public programs. For more information, visit www.currier.org or call 603-669-6144 x108. 

 

 

 


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